baltimore oriole

Local Weavers

Local Weavers

On the same hike that yielded the thoughts and photos for the "Brave Little Toaster" entry, I saw an orange-yellow bird...

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement:

Orioles and Apple Trees

Orioles and Apple Trees

In early March, Andy and I closed on a new house...

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement:

That May Be All That Happened


How’s that for creativity? You take a toy that costs a couple of dollars, and you ruin it by using it as a toy that can be found on the ground for free.

In all seriousness, it wasn’t ruined. But that’s only because I took it away after a couple of minutes.


This little dude was waaaaaay up in a tree, so my 75x300 could only bring him so close. I’m a little stumped on what he was. Based on body type and behavior, he’s clearly an Oriole of some kind, but even my dad couldn’t be sure. Our best guess is an immature Baltimore Oriole.

One Chuck-It chewed. One bird not quite identified. That, my friends, was May in pictures.

I mean, I did other stuff. I just didn’t take photographs of it, apparently.

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement:

Branching Out and Zooming In


This morning, since I found myself with ten extra minutes before I needed to leave for school, I opened the window, clicked in the telephoto, and snapped away. Practically the first thing I saw was a Baltimore Oriole in a treetop level with the second floor.

I’ve been photographing the dogs and writing about them for a while, but that’s hardly my only interest and hardly the only thing in my life I might want to take a picture of and share with other folks. The telephoto lens brings a few more subjects in range.


Back in the winter, we put up a little bird feeder on the second floor porch, and I pulled the screen out of the biggest window in the front of the house so I could take pictures of birds at the feeder. I also cleaned both the inside and the outside of the window. I had the window wide open for these pictures, though, since even clean glass will take the crispness off a feather.

This female Downy Woodpecker has taken a shine to the black oil sunflower seeds we serve up on our porch and she can be pugnacious about pushing off the finches and titmice. She certainly isn’t skittish about the shutter clicking wildly only a few feet away from her.

The House Finches are also exceedingly fond of the Sunflower seeds, and are equally happy perched on the feeder or running cleanup duty on the railing.

What would a New England feeder be without a Tufted Titmouse to visit it from time to time?

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement: