Moosilauke

4802, Round Three

We've tried to make hiking Moosilauke a tradition, but we haven't been able to make it every single year. The last time we went was back in 2009, but we've been running and hiking a ton more this year, so it was only natural for us to get our butts up the mountain this year.

The weather was a bit iffy, so we blasted up and down the mountain in 3 1/2 hours in order to beat the afternoon thunderstorms.

As we've gotten more fit, we've been able to keep up with the dogs better. A year ago, we'd have taken a lot longer than 3 1/2 hours for a 7+ mile hike with almost 2500 feet of ascent and descent. This isn't the first time this summer we've defeated the Golden Retrievers, and it won't be the last.

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement:

Family at 4,802 Feet

Lynn’s cabin is in Bridgton, and about two hours’ drive to the west is one of our favorite spots in the whole world: Mount Moosilauke. I was introduced to this mountain years ago when I was taking classes at Dartmouth. The college owns the land, and an old friend of mine who went to Dartmouth as an undergrad showed me the trails and let me know that well-trained dogs are specifically allowed to be off-leash.

Andy and I did this hike a few years ago with Gus, not long after we first met, and we’ve been longing to head back up the mountain.

Moosilauke has perhaps the best views in the White Mountains. The main peak has 360˚ views of the surrounding landscape, and it’s 4,802 feet at the peak. The dogs took the climb completely in stride, even though it’s probably the single greatest ascent they’ve done in their lives. Even so, I think it was harder on me than on either Andy or the dogs.

I’ve blown up the picture below because it just sums up the day for me, and I don’t think it translates in a smaller size. Neither Jax nor I am capable of flight, but when he sails across the mountain grass so high up, it’s hard to do anything but get lost in the air with him.

Sign up with your email address to receive an e-mail notification when there is a new entry in the Journal.

* indicates required
Advertisement: